Fish Bites: Post-Uggla edition


Fish Bites has been absent during the season for a variety of reasons, but I figure that today would be as a good a day as any for its return. In the wake of the Dan Uggla trade, let’s see what the blogosphere (including myself, of course) has to say about the move:

- If you’d like to know what Larry Beinfest thought of the trade, you can hear it from the horse’s mouth, straight from the GM meetings.

- Joe Capozzi of the Palm Beach Post had this interesting nugget amidst his recap of the trade:

Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria had told Uggla “don’t be greedy” in a phone call earlier this month after the slugger rejected a four-year, $48 million contract offer. That helped spark a stalemate that ended with Florida trading the franchise’s all-time home run king.

I’m no negotiator, but can someone tell Jeffrey Loria not to get involved in these sorts of matters next time. I’m guessing things will get a bit icy after you call a player who has the right to reject a (fair, in my opinion) offer “greedy” for doing so.

- In fairness to Loria, sources say that Uggla was not budging from a desired five-year, $71M deal. That seems a bit high, no?

- Greg Stoda at the Palm Beach Post had some very harsh words about this transaction. One question: the Marlins made a smart decision to pass on a five-year deal to a player that would be 36 years old by the end of the deal. They offered a fair contract extension to one of their favorite players. What part of that was cheap? The reaction may have been bush league, but that decision was not bad.

- Good friend of the Maniac David of Marlins Diehards agrees with my sentiment that this trade wasn’t good, but Uggla did not deserve the offer he wanted. Also, he had some other super serious analyses to share.

- You know that FishStripes is always first to receive the fans’ reactions. It’s not pretty.

- Here’s FanGraphs’ Eno Sarris on the deal, complete with a few screw-ups regarding the highway that goes to Atlanta. I-75 does take you to Atlanta, but it turns into I-85 at some point near downtown.

- The day before, friend of the Maniac Peter W. Hjort of Capitol Avenue Club thought acquiring Uggla would be a bad idea. When the trade came through and cost the Atlanta Braves a lot less than he expected, he rejoiced.

- Mark Simon of ESPN’s Stats blog says that both sides got what they needed statistically. Except that our side got “a better hitter with runners in scoring position,” which I think is mostly a matter of dumb luck.

- If you’re interested, Ken Rosenthal has the potential offer the Toronto Blue Jays made to us. Which package do you like better?

- Other respected bloggers have weighed in. Adam Morris of Lone Star Ball was not surprised that Uggla pulled in as little as he did.

- FanSided’s own John Parent of Motor City Bengals was underwhelmed by the trade and thinks the Marlins faithful cannot put their trust in this front office.

- Rob Neyer thinks the Marlins just flat out got worse in the deal. Yup.

- J.C. Bradbury thinks the Braves improved, but his salary model says that they paid more surplus value to do so.

- Jason Hunt of Jason’s Baseball Blog had his response. He too wonders if the Marlins were just overreacting to the broken contract negotiations.

- And finally, thanks to friend of the Maniac JD Sussman for this excellent bit of Twitter analysis.

Tags: Dan Uggla Miami Marlins

  • MarlinsMaaku

    Why do people think the Marlins got a bad deal for Uggla..?
    It might have been the best available , Remember Uggla has been on the trading block
    all year , and if he is the superstar he thinks he is. where were the big market teams
    and the teams in need of hitting..? No one wants to pay above market for a guy in his 30′s, a choker and a statue on D.

    Can the Braves sign him..? or did they trade for a one year rental..?

    • Michael Jong

      MarlinsMaaku,

      First off, thanks for stopping by Marlin Maniac!

      The reason why people think the Marlins got a bad deal is because they simply did not get enough back for Uggla’s 2011 season. Yes, he’s only available for one more year until he becomes a free agent, but considering the Type A draft compensation and his likely performance in 2011, he was probably worth more than what they received. The big market teams weren’t necessarily lining up because they didn’t need Uggla, but there were a number of clubs who apparently were interested. Sure, this could have been the best offer, but if it was, why wouldn’t the Marlins opt to just take the draft picks after 2011? Why pull a deal for a player and get little future value in return? Why instead take a deal that was decently BELOW market? Those are the questions Marlins fans want to know.