Miami Marlins History: All-Time Top 20 OPS (an in-depth look, 20-11)

MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 1: Giancarlo Stanton #27 of the Miami Marlins walks to the dugout striking out in the ninth inning of play against the Atlanta Braves, ending his bid for 60 home runs for the season at Marlins Park on October 1, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - OCTOBER 1: Giancarlo Stanton #27 of the Miami Marlins walks to the dugout striking out in the ninth inning of play against the Atlanta Braves, ending his bid for 60 home runs for the season at Marlins Park on October 1, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images) /
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21 Oct 1997: Third baseman Bobby Bonilla of the Florida Marlins in action during the third game of the World Series against the Cleveland Indians at Jacobs Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The Marlins won the game 14-11. Mandatory Credit: Brian Bahr /Allsport /

11) Bobby Bonilla (.841)

Bobby Bonilla was a Bronx native who was initially signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1981. Eventually, he spent six seasons with the Bucs, and then three and a half with the New York Mets.

At the 1995 trading deadline, the Mets traded Bonilla with PTBNL Jimmy Williams to the Baltimore Orioles for Damon Buford and Alex Ochoa. He played in 220 games over parts of two seasons with them.

After the 1996 season, the then-34-year-old Bonilla tested out free agency for the second time, and the Florida Marlins gladly signed him.

Bonilla manned the hot corner for the Marlins that season in their drive to their first World Series Championship. Defense was not a strong suit for Bonilla, who committed 29 errors for the Marlins at third base for a .938 fielding percentage. Offensively, he slashed .297/.378/.468 wtih 17 home runs and 96 RBI. In the postseason for the Marlins, he hit .250 with two homers and 10 RBI.

Bonilla continued with the Florida Marlins in the same vein to start the following season, slashing .278/.355/.454 in 28 games. He also continued to make routine plays adventurous for Marlins’ faithful, booting six balls in his abbreviated time with the club for a .922 fielding percentage. On May 14th, the Marlins traded Bonilla with Manuel Barrios, Jim Eisenreich, Charles Johnson, and Gary Sheffield to the Los Angeles Dodgers for Mike Piazza and Todd Zeile.

Despite being a natural designated hitter, Bonilla never returned to the American League. He spent a season each with the Dodgers, the Mets, the Atlanta Braves, and the St. Louis Cardinals to close out his career in 2001. Bonilla’s time with the Mets included an infamous contract deal, immortalized by Bobby Bonilla Day.

Next: The Miami Marlins need a healthy Martin Prado

Thanks for reading today’s slideshow. Tune in tomorrow for part two of the Florida / Miami Marlins all-time OPS leaderboard. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and subscribe to our daily newsletter.

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