Five Things the Miami Marlins Need to Learn Before the End of the Season

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 6: J.T. Realmuto #11 of the Miami Marlins talks with pitcher Kyle Barraclough #46 during the ninth inning of the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Marlins Park on August 6, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 6: J.T. Realmuto #11 of the Miami Marlins talks with pitcher Kyle Barraclough #46 during the ninth inning of the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Marlins Park on August 6, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images) /
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WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 06: Martin Prado #14 of the Miami Marlins at bat against the Washington Nationals during the eighth inning at Nationals Park on July 06, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Scott Taetsch/Getty Images) /

Martin Prado

The Captain. No, not Derek Jeter, but third baseman Martin Prado.

Prado has spent four seasons with the Miami Marlins, and for the first two seasons slashed a composite .297/.349/.406 with 17 round-trippers and 138 RBI. He played in a total of 282 games for the 2015 and 2016 Marlins.

In 2017, Prado was haunted by his right leg. First with a recurrent hamstring problem which necessitated two separate trips to the disabled list, then later with a sprained right knee which took him completely out of the action soon after the all-star break. He played in a total of just 37 games.

This season, he’s been bothered by his left leg. A hamstring strain put him out of action for most of the first three months of the season. He managed to get his slashline up to .244/.288/.301 before straining his left quadricep on Monday. It’s unclear whether Prado will add to the 53 games in which he’s appeared this season.

Prado will turn 35 soon after the season ends, and is under contract next season for $15 million. A tremendously respected veteran, the Miami Marlins need to retain his services as part of the major league coaching staff, and eventual manager.

In the meantime, they would be best served by keeping Prado to spot starts and pinch hitting appearances. He doesn’t boast the same defensive range as he used to, and Brian Anderson, while a good right fielder, could be a great third baseman (his natural position).