Marlins Trade Rumors: Finding the right deal to accept

MIAMI, FLORIDA - APRIL 12: Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Miami Marlins celebrates with Lewis Brinson #9 after scoring a run in the seventh inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Marlins Park on April 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - APRIL 12: Jorge Alfaro #38 of the Miami Marlins celebrates with Lewis Brinson #9 after scoring a run in the seventh inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Marlins Park on April 12, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images) /
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The Miami Marlins are willing to wait their turn to find the right trade partner as the MLB Trade Deadline is less than 24 hours away.

There are a few more hours until the MLB trade deadline. Like 29 other teams, the Miami Marlins are biding their time, looking for the right dance partner.

They have already danced with the Minnesota twins this past weekend, and could find more suitors for veteran players with expiring contracts. Not only has this become a sophisticated dance, it’s been a highly intense game of chess, we are both Michael Hill and Derek Jeter hope to make more winning moves.

Not only do the Marlins hope to find players to help their future, but they must also take into account that addition by subtraction applies here. The trade of Sergio Romo to the Twins opened the doors for other younger arms to assume the team’s closer role. But it also did the same thing to the team that happened last year where manager Don Mattingly was left with a ninth-inning specialist by committee approach.

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The Marlins are 41-63 this season and aren’t going anywhere in the postseason, but they do continue to push forward for the future.

What helped the Marlins more than anything with the deal involving the twins, it is the American League Central team agreed to pay the remaining $875,000 of Romo’s salary for this season. That means money is taken off the books, which is always a good thing for a cash – strapped ball club. The Marlins must also determine whether they can unload other salaries which are cumbersome at best.

Expiring contracts of players like Neil Walker and Curtis Granderson will come off the books next season. The team also has a $1 million buyout clause of Starlin Castro’s contract. If the team decides to keep him on the roster, they are on the hook for $16 million next year which makes no sense given the plethora of talent in their minor-league system.

The Marlins seek hitters who are Major-League-ready or close to being ready who will not make a huge impact on their payroll. Like many fans in South Florida, I am still waiting for the day that Jeter and the ownership group open it’s wallet and is willing to spend money on big-time hitting.

That still may be two years away. The blueprint that has been preached the last two seasons talks about building a foundation with younger players that are developed through the minor-league system. It has not been discussed when this team goes from being an organization of selling to a franchise of buying.

Another part of Miami’s equation for the end of the season to be considered will be whom they bring up when teams expanded rosters September 1. How will trades made this week, if there are more, impact which players who have an opportunity to show their talents on the next level after spending this past season in the minor leagues?

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