Get Excited: The Miami Marlins 2021 Opening Day Starting Lineup

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Miguel Rojas #19 of the Miami Marlins fields a hit by Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets as teammate Isan Diaz #1 of the Marlins ducks out of the way in the seventh inning against the New York Mets at Citi Field on September 24, 2019 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 24: Miguel Rojas #19 of the Miami Marlins fields a hit by Wilson Ramos #40 of the New York Mets as teammate Isan Diaz #1 of the Marlins ducks out of the way in the seventh inning against the New York Mets at Citi Field on September 24, 2019 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images) /
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With the 2019 Major League Baseball (regular) season firmly in our collective rear-view mirror, fans from across the country set their sights on the future of their respective teams.

For some of those teams, eight to be exact, the future is happening right now, and each of them have visions of hoisting the World Series Trophy this year. Seven of those teams are wrong. One thing that they have in common with the 20 non-playoff teams, along with the Milwaukee Brewers and the Oakland Athletics, is that there will be more baseball to play soon enough. The Miami Marlins are no different.

Four-and-a-half months does not seem like a particularly long time, but for some, waiting for spring baseball can seem like an eternity. Since “wait ’til next year” became a yearly mantra for long-suffering Brooklyn Dodgers fans, every team but one has come up short, in every season.

The Miami Marlins have twice avoided the old colloquialism, but have somehow dodged a winning record for nigh-on a decade at last count. For the Miami Marlins in particular, eyeing next season has become a pastime of its own. With all this in mind, it’s only natural that we would want to prognosticate what this team will look like in the future.

A caveat: This article is not taking into consideration the hazards and prizes of free agency, but is concentrating instead on home-grown talent – that is – players currently in the Miami Marlins system at one level or another.

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