Can the Marlins outfield prove its better in 2020?

PITTSBURGH, PA - SEPTEMBER 05: Harold Ramirez #47 of the Miami Marlins celebrates with Jon Berti #55 after the final out in a 10-7 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on September 5, 2019 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images)
PITTSBURGH, PA - SEPTEMBER 05: Harold Ramirez #47 of the Miami Marlins celebrates with Jon Berti #55 after the final out in a 10-7 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on September 5, 2019 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images) /
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With so many additions to the team’s roster this offseason, can the Miami Marlins outfield prove it will be better at the plate this season?

After watching the Miami Marlins add to the outfield pool this off-season, I wonder if these moves are enough to help the spa club move out of the cellar of the National League East.

The Marlins didn’t make a “ splash“ in signing players to big-time contracts, but they did bring in veterans who could make an impact at the plate. The worst thing Miami could do starting at the end of March in its attempt to swing for the fences and play better defense is fail to make improvements.

It appears every team in the National League East added to their roster this offseason with the Braves making the biggest splash by signing Marcell Ozuna last week.

Corey Dickerson is a nice corner outfield piece who should have a better season in 2020. How much she helps this team is still unknown.

More from Marlins News

"“Perhaps the biggest offseason addition for the Marlins was the signing of Corey Dickerson to a two-year, $17.5 million contract, Mark Bowman writes.“The left-handed-hitting left fielder was an All-Star with the Rays in 2017, and he spent last season with the Pirates and Phillies. Dickerson projects to hit in the middle of the lineup and also provide veteran leadership to a young outfield group. He’s also the only true answer for one of the three outfield spots heading into Spring Training.”"

The Marlins have plenty of options to choose from. This either helps manager Don Mattingly’s decision or it hinders it because there is so much versatility on this roster. Brian Anderson figures to be the teams starting right fielder. John Berti can play in centerfield or in the infield. Dickerson should be in left field. And then there is the question of who plays in centerfield, which is as complicated as trying to figure out a Rubik’s cube right now.

There are also minor-league prospects who are on the cusp of making the major league team. It’s possible that the Marlins have too many decisions to make, but when was the last time someone said that about this organization?

"“Like Dickerson, Anderson is a middle-of-the-order option for manager Don Mattingly. Garrett Cooper is a candidate to be in right as well. Center field is up for grabs. Lewis Brinson, who has underperformed in his first two seasons in Miami, has to win the job,” Bowman adds.“If he doesn’t, then there will be a scramble. Monte Harrison, the Marlins’ No. 5 prospect, could be a sleeper to win the Opening Day spot. Berti, ideally suited to be a utility option, is a candidate for center, as is Harold Ramirez, who is better suited for either corner. [Jonathan] Villar could play somewhere in the outfield, perhaps even center. And Jesús Sánchez, the No. 3 prospect in the organization, is knocking on the door.”"

Next. Florida Marlins History: Appreciating Jorge Cantu. dark

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