Miami Marlins hitting may be historically bad

MIAMI, FL - MARCH 27: A general view of the new Marlins logo in the outfield during 2019 Workout Day at Marlins Park on March 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MARCH 27: A general view of the new Marlins logo in the outfield during 2019 Workout Day at Marlins Park on March 27, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images) /
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Miami Marlins hitting may be historically bad. We already established that our offense is officially below average. The question is whether our lineup is also historically bad or if it’s just really bad this season. Let’s take a look at our history and see how our 2022 team compares.

The Miami Marlins may have a historically bad offense.

The 2022 Miami Marlins have a below average offense. We are batting .233/.297/.368 while scoring 3.67 runs per game. All of this is comfortably below average. The inaugural 1993 team had a .248/.314/.346 batting line while scoring 3.59 runs per game. I want to say that our offense now is similar with it being a toss-up leaning towards the 1993 team being worse.

The Miami Marlins (I’ll use the current name over the actual “Florida Marlins” name for convenience), from the shortened 1994 season  batted .266/.330/.396 and scored 4.07 runs per game, beating the 2022 team. What about the 1995 shortened season team? That team batted .262/.335/.406 and scored 4.71 runs per game, comfortably passing the 2022 team. The 1996 team batted .257/.329/.393 and scored 4.25 runs per game, doing better than the 2022 team.

The championship winning 1997 Miami Marlins team batted .259/.346/.395 and scored 4.57 runs per game. Again better than the 2022 team. The 1998 team batted .248/.317/.373 and scored 4.12 runs per game, doing better. The 1999 team batted .263/.325/.395 and scored 4.27 runs per game, being better again. The 2000 team batted .262/.331/.409 with 4.54 runs per game. Yes, better. The 2001 team batted .264/.326/.423 with 4.58 runs per game. The 2002 team batted .261/.337/.403 with 4.31 runs per game.

Should we even look at the championship winning 2003 team? .266/.333/.421 with 4.64 runs per game. 2004? .264/.329/.406 with 4.43 runs per game. 2005? .272/.339/.409 with 4.43 runs per game. 2006? .264/.331/.435 with 4.68 runs per game. 2007? .267/.336/.448 with 4.88 runs per game. 2008? .254/.326/.433 with 4.78 runs per game. 2009? .268/.340/.416 with 4.77 runs per game. 2010? .254/.321/.403 with 4.44 runs per game.

What about the 2011 Miami Marlins? .247/.318/.388 with 3.86 runs per game, just barely better. 2012? .244/.308/.382 with 3.76 runs per game. Just barely better again. 2013? .231/.293/.335 with 3.17 runs per game, WORSE than the 2022 team. 2014? .253/.317/.378 with 3.98 runs per game, better. 2015? .360/.310/.384 with 3.78 runs per game. 2016? .263/.322/.394 with 4.07 runs per game. 2017? .267/.331/.441 with 4.80 runs per game. 2018? .237/.303/.357 with 3.66 runs per game, toss-up. 2019? .241/.298/.375 with 3.80 runs per game.

The 2020 Miami Marlins who made the playoffs batted .244/.319/.384 with 4.38 runs per game. Finally, the 2021 team batted .233/.298/.372 with 3.85 runs per game. The 2022 offense is in contention for the worst in Miami Marlins history.

light. Related Story. There’s more

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