The best hitting philosophy for the Miami Marlins? Part 1

MIAMI, FLORIDA - AUGUST 15: A detailed view of the New Era Miami Marlins Sugar Kings hat in the dugout during the game against the Chicago Cubs at loanDepot park on August 15, 2021 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - AUGUST 15: A detailed view of the New Era Miami Marlins Sugar Kings hat in the dugout during the game against the Chicago Cubs at loanDepot park on August 15, 2021 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images) /
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The Miami Marlins are changing our hitting philosophy. It appears that we’re moving away from focusing on power and moving to a more small ball oriented approach. This should lead to us pursuing players who fit that mold. It begs the question of whether it’s the right move. Which strategy has led to more World Series wins in the last 21 years? I decided to analyze this in a simple way: home runs = power oriented team and average and stolen bases = small ball.

Which hitting philosophy benefits the Miami Marlins the most?

2000 New York Yankees: The team was slightly above average in home runs (205) and more so in average (.278). Just barely above average in stolen bases (99).Hard to place them in either category.

2001 Arizona Diamondbacks: They were also slightly above average in home runs (208) and the same with average (.267). Below average in stolen bases (71). They were neither really.

2002 Anaheim Angels: They were below average in home runs (152) but first in average with .282 and ekite in SB’s (117). That’s a small ball team.

2003 Florida Marlins: Below average in home runs (157), above average in average (.266) and first in stolen bases (150). Small ball team.

2004 Boston Red Sox: Top 5 in home runs (222),  tied for first in average (.282), below average in SB’s (68). They were closer to a home run team.

2005 Chicago White Sox: Top 5 in home runs (200), below average in average (.262) and top 4 in SB’s (137). Weird mix.

2006 St. Louis Cardinals: Above average in homers (184), average in batting average (.269), below average in SB’s (59).

2007 Boston Red Sox: Average in home runs (166), top 6 in average (.279), average in stolen bases (96). They were neither one.

2008 Philadelphia Phillies: Second in home runs (214), below average in average (.255) and top 4 in stolen bases (156). They were neither one.

2009 New York Yankees: First in home runs (244), second in average (.283), slightly above average in SB’s (111). Great complete offense.

To be continued…

Next. Would you do these trades?. dark

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