Five Things the Miami Marlins Need to Learn Before the End of the Season

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 6: J.T. Realmuto #11 of the Miami Marlins talks with pitcher Kyle Barraclough #46 during the ninth inning of the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Marlins Park on August 6, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 6: J.T. Realmuto #11 of the Miami Marlins talks with pitcher Kyle Barraclough #46 during the ninth inning of the game against the St. Louis Cardinals at Marlins Park on August 6, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images) /
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MIAMI, FL – APRIL 11: Fans sitting in the stands during the game between the New York Mets and Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on April 11, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images) /

Attendance

The Miami Marlins have drawn 609,665 through their first 63 home games. For those of you who don’t have a calculator in your heads, that’s just 9,677 fans per game, easily the worst figure in the major leagues.

The Marlins’ attendance problems are well documented and long-standing. Although there is a long-term deal in place to keep the Miami Marlins in Miami, can you really picture the team here in 40 years if people continue to refuse to support them?

I know that fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. I know that the Marlins have orchestrated “fire sales” on four different occasions, as such things are defined. I know that the new group, led by Sherman and headed by Jeter, inherited an untenable business model as it stood.

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I also know that building this organization from the ground up is undoubtedly the right way to go about things. Miami has unloaded most of their high-dollar contracts. Not just Giancarlo Stanton, Dee Gordon, Christian Yelich, and Marcell Ozuna, either. Also Brad Ziegler and Junichi Tazawa (which remains on the books, unfortunately). High-dollar remnants are the aforementioned Chen and Prado, as well as Starlin Castro. Outside of that, the Marlins may finally have some room to field a competitive team.

The fans will follow the wins, so the theory says anyway. Jeter has thus far not gained the trust of the Miami Marlins fanbase, but I really think that we need to give him more time.

We knew this year was a bust right from the very beginning. Anything more than 65 wins will be more than anyone expected, and anything less really isn’t hurting anybody. This club can return to contention, sooner rather than later. We just need to #Re2pecttheProcess.

dark. Next. The Future of the Miami Marlins?

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