What if the Marlins do not trade Starlin Castro?

MIAMI, FL - MAY 05: Starlin Castro #13 of the Miami Marlins looks up to the sky after grounding out in the fourth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Marlins Park on May 5, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - MAY 05: Starlin Castro #13 of the Miami Marlins looks up to the sky after grounding out in the fourth inning against the Atlanta Braves at Marlins Park on May 5, 2019 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images) /
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Would the Marlins consider keeping one of their veteran trade pieces?

What if Marlins can’t trade their second baseman, Starlin Castro? What if there isn’t a market for the veteran and he plays out the remainder of the season in Miami?

Believe it or not, as it is explained on MLB.com, the connection between Castro, who came over to the Marlins last off-season in a trade that sent Giancarlo Stanton to the Yankees, and their No. 6 prospect Isan Diaz isn’t as tight as we all may think.

Yes, Diaz is the team’s second baseman of the future, but there are reasons for the Marlins slow playing their prospect’s movement.

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Castro hasn’t had the same kind of season he did in 2017. He is hitting .248 with eight home runs. He is a career .279 hitter. Diaz, who is still developing at the teams AAA affiliate in New Orleans, it is displaying the kind of power the team hoped of him, but he is still fairly raw as a prospect. He has 24 home runs with 64 RBI while batting. .303 in the Pacific Coast League.

As Joe Frisaro explained, the Marlins front office isn’t as worried about getting Diaz to the Majors as they are making sure he is a consistent threat both offensively and defensively.

"“Yes, they both play second base,” he writes. “But if the Marlins’ plan was to get Diaz to the big leagues as quickly as possible, he easily could play third, and even get some reps in left field, if necessary.”"

Brian Anderson is the team’s third baseman and doesn’t figure to be going anywhere anytime soon.

The team will have some decisions to make concerning Castro and how they want to treat this off-season. He is making $11 million this year and will be owed $16 million in 2020. There is a $1 million buyout clause in his contract which makes it easier to release him after the season.

Diaz does provide versatility for the team in the future. The Marlins do expect to make changes to their 25-man roster next year, with the veterans being released or traded.

Frisaro believes It is a 50-50 split on whether he gets traded this coming week.

The Marlins have done a better job of acquiring minor-league prospects around the diamond for their future. Through trades last season and the MLB draft, the team has solidified the middle of its infield for the foreseeable future.

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