The Miami Marlins will pay players through MiLB season

JUPITER, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 23: Monte Harrison #60 of the Miami Marlins in action during the spring training game against the Washington Nationals at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium on February 23, 2020 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images)
JUPITER, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 23: Monte Harrison #60 of the Miami Marlins in action during the spring training game against the Washington Nationals at Roger Dean Chevrolet Stadium on February 23, 2020 in Jupiter, Florida. (Photo by Mark Brown/Getty Images) /
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The Miami Marlins have announced the organization will continue to pay its minor leaguers despite the potential of there being no season this year.

The Miami Marlins are making sure their minor league players will be paid through the end of their seasons, according to Miami Herald and other sources.

Since the threat of COVID-19 has halted Major League Baseball until there is a plan in place to resume Spring Training and the eventual start of the 2020 season, minor league baseball has been put on the back burner. It is believed there will not be a season where prospects for the Marlins at any level, will play in their respective leagues.

The plan, according to what has been proposed by MLB and accepted by the owners of all 30 teams, is to have a 30-man roster with a 20-man taxi squad. This would allow the Marlins to use top prospects and bring them up to the Majors when there is a need.

More from Marlins Prospects

op prospects Monte Harrison, Jesus Sanchez, Lewin Diaz, and Nick Neidert all figure to see the Majors at some point this season, but unfortunately, it will have an effect on all Marlins prospects this coming season.

"“Major League Baseball mandated that all teams pay their minor-league players a minimum of $400 per week through at least May 31, which is this Sunday,” Jordan McPherson of the Miami Herald writes.“The Marlins, however, are extending the weekly stipends through the end of August, which essentially covers the entire minor-league season. Miami is the only team at this point that has committed to paying their minor-league players for that length of time.”"

The Marlins players, coaches, and front office are awaiting news of when the season will officially begin. There are still a few issues that must be worked out between the Players Association and the owners before a start date can be set. As it was reported by CBS Sports, the players may ask for a longer season. It was believed teams would play 82 games, which is exactly half a season.

"“Nationals right-hander and union member Max Scherzer on Wednesday night tweeted that players have ‘no reason to engage with MLB in any further compensation reductions.’ This reflects the union’s position that compensation for 2020 was a settled matter as of the March agreement in which they agreed to pro-rate their salaries based on the number of games played. Scherzer further called on MLB to release the relevant financials that would show the extent of projected revenue losses for 2020,” the CBS Sports staff reports."

The longer the season is halted, the longer the Miami Marlins and the 29 other MLB teams lose money. In addition to the minor league teams not playing ball this year and each other, those teams suffering financial losses, the loss of games that have already been scraped from the season means a loss of revenue for home games.

"Per McPherson, “According to Baseball America, which first reported the Marlins’ payment plan, the Detroit Tigers are paying their minor-leaguers the $400 per week through the end of June. The Philadelphia Phillies will also continue payments, although the exactly weekly disbursements have not been determined.”"

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